winsome wisteria.

It’s becoming difficult not to be inspired by and immersed in the blooms of spring.  Wisteria vines have been a backdrop that emerge with lavender blooms a certain time of year as far as I can remember.  While I always liked purple and shades of lavender in my youth, I decided I really disliked lavender in more recent years as I felt that it was almost too child-like.  It wasn’t until I started falling in love with creme pastel nail polish last spring that I decided that I enjoyed the pale washes of purple in small moments on my nails and felt that in the right applications and tinged in the right hues, it could be a nice accent color.  I decided this so much so that I have collected a gradient of polishes in this color family.  The lacquers shown are OPI Parlez-Vous OPI, OPI Done Out in Deco, and OPI Rumple’s Wiggin’.  The shades of the wisteria in my backyard are closer to these pink and grey-tinged colors of the polish as opposed to the periwinkle variety, so I was inspired to do a manicure in their honor.  Even though Parlez has a lot more brown tones to it, I almost felt as if I saw that color in moments of the closed shaded petals.

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shimmering palisades.

The perfect blue-tinged grey is one of my favorite colors.  It can be a calming hue on its own with just enough color to keep it interesting, but it has the potential to be a particularly charming neutral posed next to a bright pop of color.  In the nail polish world, Nubar Palisade is the shade of blue-grey that I find myself drawn to.  Alone, it can be a beauty in a mere one coat.  I discovered how to make it really come alive with a top layer of China Glaze White Cap.  The glass flecks of White Cap shimmer from a clean white to a golden yellow that can reflect a peachy hue.  Layered over Palisade, the effect is reminiscent of the way sunlight reflects off of slightly restless water.  I am reminded of many drives on the bridge glancing over at the way the sun low in the sky shimmers on the lake when I observe this combination.

First, I played with playing with the combination against broken concrete showing the more subtle side of the shimmer and showcasing Palisade.

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effortless emerald.

For my St. Patrick’s Day manicure, I wanted a nice emerald green with a little something extra.  I don’t have many greens for some reason, so I picked up Wet N Wild’s Sagreena the Teenage Witch while I was at the drugstore.  While I was pleased with the emerald green shimmer, I knew I wanted something a little more exciting to top it off with.  A few days later, I was scouring Sally’s clearance rack for fun and I came across a much reduced bottle of China Glaze’s Zombie Zest which I’ve always been curious about.  After purchasing it, I curiously tested a thin layer of it over the existing emerald green and I was thrilled at the result.  The eerie, murky green glass flecks of Zest added a meadow-reminiscent idyllic depth to the deep green base.

The featured sculpture is a vintage flower frog for flower arranging that I picked up at an antique store.  I love the color and the whimsical design of a nude woman riding a fish on stylized, cresting waves.  She’d probably be worth more if she weren’t broken, but alas, she was in such a condition when I purchased her.  It reminds me of the porcelain people in the Wizard of Oz who were afraid to run for fear of falling and breaking and never being the same due to the cracks the irrevocable damage would cause.  I happen to find her enchanting all the same.

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for Neptune.

In honor of the many evenings in high school that I spent replicating Sailor Moon imagery and the moments in class doodling more Sailor Moon symbols and doodles on many notes to pass in the hall, I decided to revisit my past while experimenting in the world of watercolor and gouache.  I made this as a Christmas present for my best friend from high school who came to discover, adore, and obsess over the unique stylings of Japanese animation at the same time I did.

I’ve always thought that a portion of the beauty lies in the process, so I also decided to document some of the layers and the transformation of my workspace as the image revealed itself.

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